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Hispanic American authors

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 3 Collections and/or Records:

Sandra María Esteves Papers

 Collection — Folder 1: [Barcode: SaEs_001]
Identifier: MSS 25
Scope and Contents

The collection contains numerous short stories and poems written by Sandra María Esteves from 1973-1979.

Dates: 1973-1979

Susana Martínez Collection

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 138
Abstract

Susana Martínez is a Puerto Rican poet and an active member of the Puerto Rican community in East Harlem “El Barrio,” New York. The Susana Martínez Collection consists of 1.2 cubic of items, including two unpublished manuscripts, drafts of her writings, copyright registrations for select pieces, correspondence, event programs, newsletters, newspaper clippings, award plaques and certificates from various organizations, and an original painting.

Dates: 1954 - 2002; Majority of material found within 1964 - 1996

Clemente Soto Vélez and Amanda A. Vélez Papers

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 60
Abstract Ground-breaking poet and one of the most significant contemporary Puerto Rican writers. Founding member of a vanguard literary movement called Atalayismo. Contains information about literary and artistic trends among Puerto Ricans in New York and Puerto Rico. Is rich in content related to pro-independence topics, political movements and community development. Consists of published and unpublished manuscripts, notes and drafts, letters, poetry, manuscripts, biographies, interviews,...
Dates: Majority of material found within 1960-1994; 1924-1994



About the Collections

Our collections consist of personal papers from prominent Puerto Rican artists, elected officials, social activists, writers, as well as the records of community-based organizations. Our largest collection, the Offices of the Government of Puerto Rico in the United States (OGPRUS) Records, measures approximately 2,900 cubic feet and contains an extraordinary amount of information regarding Puerto Rican migrants and the government institutions established to assist them. The collections date from the 1890s to the present, and document Puerto Rican communities in the Northeast, Midwest, Florida, California and Hawaii.